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is in fact what happens. this was a chronology and when the united states government announced a large-scale resettlement of iraqis in 2007, we immediately looked at what we should be doing in light of this particular population which was different, in nationality we had not been resettling a great deal. we looked at enhancements which could bring on board that would address this new population and that's when we created the partnership with d.o. de. later >> was this in 2007? >> will yes, later when we identified a new partnership with the counter-terrorism center, that was initially focused on iraqi applicants but we learned by doing and we learned about the heightened level of checks and then we expanded to applicants of all nationalities. we use the iraqi program to raise the bar across the board for other nationalities. >> there were some 25,000 per year for a few years, isn't that right? >> i believe the high point was 18,000 ballots did you have the resources to do some kind of fairly thorough assessment of each of those 18,000 before they were able to be granted -- >> yes, sir,
status and resettlement in the united states. while the motivation behind creating these special immigrant categories were well intentioned, the fact remains that in may 2011, two iraqi nationals who were given refugee status and resettled in the u.s. were arrested and accused by the fbi of plotting to send weapons and money to al qaeda in iraq. one of the men arrested had openly discussed his prior experience as an insurgent in iraq and the ied attacks he participated against u.s. troops. the fingerprints of the other iraqi refugee charged were traced by the fbi to a component of an unexploded ied that was recovered by u.s. forces in northern iraq. in the wake of these arrests, dhs secretary janet napolitano and others have publicly acknowledged that security checks have been expanded to the more than 58,000 iraqi refugees who had already been settled in the united states. according to press reports this past february, intelligence indicates that the threat posed by refugees with ties to al qaeda is much broader than was previously believed. fbi director robert mueller stated la
to keep in mind where we have been and where we are going. we have 20 women in the united states senate. we have 80 men. there are only 16 democratic women in the senate, and four republican. we have a long, long ways to go. the united states of america was 77th in the world in the percentage of elected women to office. we cannot as an organization take on the whole problem. we believe that we need more women. our piece of the puzzle is to elect pro-choice democratic women. the democratic party is for the most part pro-choice. the vast majority of the women we work with are pro choice anyway. as the organization, when we started women were not running. part of what we do is not so much to choose them and make it happen, but we encourage women to step up and take this on. we need a lot more of that. we do not have enough women running for office in this country. host: why not the republican party? guest: it is not something that women think of doing right away. there is a study done by rutgers a couple of years ago that asks the question of all of these legislatures, women and men. how m
the way back to a deal that john lewis and harry truman made in 1946. the united mine workers and i insisted on a new law that we called the coal act protecting 200,000 miners and their families today. we actually helped avert a nationwide coal strike in 1994. in that fight, and so many others, we have been proud to stand with the working men and women of america. steelworkers, teachers, nurses, and everyone deserves a fair wage and a safe place to work with a basic health care. [applause] our country cannot be as great as it should be unless our workers voices are heard and respected. not only by everybody in general, but certainly policymakers. i am just a single-minded about comprehensive health-care reform. i know is not particularly popular in west virginia, but it's ok. because of my fingerprints are all over it, i know is good and i know it will benefit west virginia more than any other state. it is so incredibly complex, not just the 17% of gdp has people like to say, but it is so complex and involved and interests of people, nuances that we just had to do something about it
parlors to traffic women and children throughout the united states, so i really urge you to say yes to this and if there's any other questions i can answer for you, i will gladly do that. >> thank you, lieutenant. commissioner kingsley. commissioner loftus, i'm sorry. >> go ahead. lieutenant, thank you very much. just your few minutes here are very informative. i'm wondering what exactly will be done with the $200,000. >> what we're looking to do is increase the investigations. it's very time-consuming. the elements to discover human trafficking, it can come in different forms. it can be a deaf domestic violence call that results in us finding human trafficking. we have some stats for you regarding what was investigated and at this point last year we had 107 cases that were investigated. we had 74 identified victims of human trafficking. that was just law enforcement based, a total of 369 victims were identified through services provided through agency-specific legal outreach or other services. what we're trying to do is work in cooperation with them so the police department
active on this issue, but the united states supreme court several times ago actually issued a ruling that really limited the due process rights in civil commitments, and really look at it, contemplated it as an extension of the existing criminal sentence. and so, but it hasn't stopped the litigation but there is a lot of work that needs to be done still on civil commitment issues. and so it's kind of an ongoing project, and is in a host of different context, another talk by specific context, but this people, people civilly committed for mental because of mental illness. and there are a range of issues that the aclu has been working on with partner groups to actually address and raise the due process concerns about civil commitment. >> can you explain something about the philosophy behind incarceration, and why, what is the idea behind isolating a person so acutely? >> so, aside from the campaign to end overincarceration, the aclu likes of the campaigns, but another one is a campaign to stop the use of solitary or at least significantly curb its use. we've been very active the last se
to vip members of congress and the official program which was a history, also has a history of the united states capitol inside plus the program of events, of course, on the public inauguration day, which is monday. you can see it right here. it's really, really quite beautiful. >> it's gold. gold glitters here. >> it's gold. >> the honor of your presence is requested at the ceremonies attending the inauguration of the president and vice president of the united states. >> the guy we were just talking about. he'll be here, you'll be here, i'll be here. >> tomorrow we'll be here, sunday we'll be here, monday lots of live coverage coming up. history unfolding and we're thrilled to be here. thanks very much for joining us. we'll see you back here tomorrow. read us as well. "erin burnett outfront" starts right now. >>> next, breaking news. cnn has learned an american has been killed during the hostage situation in algeria. plus the man who says he's behind the attack has the nickname "the marlboro man" and "the jihad prince." >>> the number of american husband holds with guns is on the decline
at the ceremonies attending the inauguration of the president and vice president of the united states. >> the guy we were just talking about. he'll be here, you'll be here, i'll be here. >> tomorrow we'll be here, sunday we'll be here, monday lots of live coverage coming up. history unfolding and we're thrilled to be here. thanks very much for joining us. we'll see you back here tomorrow. read us as well. "erin burnett outfront" starts right now. >>> next, breaking news. cnn has learned an american has been killed during the hostage situation in algeria. plus the man who says he's behind the attack has the nickname "the marlboro man" and "the jihad prince." >>> the number of american husband holds with guns is on the decline but the nra's power is growing. it is growing even after newtown. breaking news, one american has been killed in the algeria hostage situation. we'll tell you what we know about that man and the other americans we are aware of tonight. let's get straight to jill dougherty at the state department. first, jill, what can you tell us about the american who died? >> there are not a l
and the investigative authority within the united states. we would be helpless if we did not work with dhs, cia, nsa, and the rest of the intelligence community. if there is one substantial change that has made the biggest difference, i would say breaking down the traditional walls between the intelligence community and the domestic law enforcement community because information flows very easily over borders now, and you cannot just see one piece of the puzzle without getting the other piece. it has made a tremendous difference and given rise to the approach from all of us that says we want to work together in a task force context. >> for our radio listeners, you are listening to the commonwealth club of california radio program. our guest today is fbi director robert muller discussing security threats concerning the united states. we would like to ask you a little bit about the national security implications of our energy policy, an issue of much concern in the news and certainly here in silicon valley. what might you say about the relationship between energy policy and some of the national securit
that cannot be cured by what is right with america. >> the united states will not ignore your oppression or excuse your oppressors. >> all are equal. all are free, and all deserve a chance to pursue their full measure of happiness. >>> the presidential inauguration is getting under way right here on the capitol, and we have a front row seat. >> here on the national mall, people are staking out their spot to experience this moment in history. >> the sun rises on barack obama's second term. >> we gather because we have chosen hope over fear. unity over purpose. >> on this day, a public celebration of the presidency after a private oath the day before. >> so help you god? >> so help me god. >> on this capitol where so many battles have been fought and will be fought, political rivalries are being set aside in a show of democracy and unity for all the world to see. >> and we remain more than a collection of red states and blue states. we are and forever will be the united states of america. >>> we're live here on the west front of the united states capitol for one of the grandest celebration
, and look at the state of immigration enforcement in the united states. this is about one-half of hours. >> good morning everyone, and happy new year. to those of you here with us today and those at home the winning this event. i am demetrios papademetriou, president of the immigration policy institute. i'd like to welcome you to the discussion of the institut's latest report titled, -- discussion of the institute's latest report. as you will see during the presentations and as you will conclude after the event is over, it is a formidable machinery that has been created in the united states over the past decade or decade and a half. the release of this report could not come at a more appropriate time. since the election and even before that, the president and leaders in the democratic party and the u.s. congress of both the would-both chambers of the u.s. congress, as well as key -- the democratic party and the u.s. congress -- both chambers of the u.s. congress have said this is time for a broad reform of the u.s. immigration system. we can only take them at their word. if this were to
. on the other hand i do not feel in my heart, that the hypothetical fiscal crisis for the united states is still many years in the future. it is not something that is about to crop up on us now. the world is sending us a signal with incredibly low interest rates. that is making it easier for us to remain our relatively profitable status. -- relatively profligate ways. we have the power to get back on a trajectory that works. it is the usual thing of how you do hard things. in your personal life you know about the urgent pile and the important pile and the challenges you get caught up doing. the same thing happened at the federal level. the urgent stuff, the crises are what get attention. that is the way we haven't been in fiscal policy. -- we have been making fiscal policy. we do have moments when something gets addressed. we look forward to more support? it is giving me the political and cons addition we have. -- consolation that we huff. one of the things we should encourage is to show some leadership. now there are three more crises lined up. assuming we have survived though can also show som
. this was a chronology, and when the united states government announced large-scale resettlement of iraqis in 2007, we immediately looked at what should we be doing in light of this particular population, which was different, the nation out of we've not been reselling a great deal. we look at what enhancement we could bring on board that would address this new population. and that's when we create the partnership with dod. initially that was iraqi focused. later when we work with the national -- >> was this in 2007? >> 2007. later when we identified additional capacity a new partnership, that initially was focus on iraq at because but we learn by doing that was learned that heightened level of checks which was initially oriented towards iraqi applicants, we expand to applicants of all nationality. so really we use the iraqi program to raise the bar across the board for other nationalities. >> there was some 20, 25,000 a year for a features are coming out of iraq. is that about right? >> i believe the high point is 18,000. >> i mean, that still 18,000 a year. did you have the resources and capacity to
of questions already are coming from the united states about the algerian government's tactics in the operation that could have put the hostages in jeopardy. now, we also want to let you know that right now, there's a chartered flight en route of bp employees from algeria. it is headed towards london to gatwick airport. now, that could be landing at any moment. we don't yet know if the passengers are any of the freed hostages or if there are americans on board, but as we get that information, we're going to share that with you. the brother of an irish national who escaped from captivity had a harrowing story. he spoke to cnn today and described what happened to his brother. >> yeah, but just found out recently that he'd been mered to sleep with duct tape over his mouth and his hands tied and then we find out how he got free and five out of the compound or to a different part of the compound, and there were five jeeps and the algerian army had bombeded the jeeps and out of the five jeeps, the bomb had wiped out four of them. and they had obviously lost their lives, but lucky enough for my brothe
at that united states anti-doping agency report, it says that there were 38 blood samples taken from lance armstrong between 2009 and 2011 when he was making that comeback in the tour de france, and it showed blood levels with values with the likelihood of occurring naturally in less than 1 in a million. so a great deal of questions will be raised as lance armstrong continues to assert that he rode those last two years cleanly. there's a great deal of speculation about that. erin? >> thanks, ed. now i want to bring in our penl. david epstein is a senior writer for "sports illustrated." dana jacobson is with cbs sports and paul callan is our legal contributor. you were all critical last night. you didn't feel satisfied. let me ask you, did you feel that -- did he win you another tonight? >> no. and i said earlier there's probably no way he could have won me over. maybe i saw a little more human side when his kids were mentioned. he was -- oprah said do you owe people an apology and he listed the people he owes an apology to, and he didn't do it last night when he had a chance. he didn't do
five of australia's six states. meanwhile, the united states records its hottest year ever. we will go to australia for report. three men of somali descent are arraigned in new york. president obama continues the controversial practice of rendition, secretly detaining, transporting, and holding prisoners overseas. part two of our exclusive interview with sami al-hajj, the of jazeera journalist imprisoned and tortured at guantanamo for six years. >> when i was in guantanamo, i asked myself maybe it is a good chance for me to be a journalist in guantanamo to be a witness. [indiscernible] >> we speak with the al jazeera journalist at al jazeera headquarters in doha, qatar. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. new figures have confirmed 2012 was the hottest year on record for the continental united states. on tuesday, the national oceanic and atmospheric administration announced an average temperature for 2012 of 55.3 degrees, one degree above the previous record and 3.2 degrees more than the 20th century ave
money from the federal government? >> i know we're constantly asking the grant unit to extend this. we have to show that we're willing to play this game and we're coming forward (inaudible) having individuals plead guilty to charges shows a lot. i think as we continue doing those kind of cases and building those cases we will see results. we have asset forfeitures that will be coming so i can foresee more things happening. >> we're currently working with the fbi right now. >> commissioner turman. >> i move that we, the ask the board of supervisors to authorize the police to retroactively accept and appropriate a grant in the amount of $200,000 from the california emergency management agency. >> second. >> first we have to have public comment. any public comment? seeing none, all in favor say aye. please call line item 5. >> line item 5, public comment on all matters pertaining to item 7 below, closed session, including public comment on vote whether to hold item 7 in closed session. >> motion with reference to the closed session matters, ladies and gentlemen these are disciplinar
and this fight has moved from northern and west africa to great britain and the united states. the chairman of the house foreign affairs committee called this a growing radical movement and supports the offensive and he is outfront tonight. thank you for taking the time. i appreciate it. the islamist military commander who we spoke to said they demand an end to the war to release the hostages. we are hearing this attack has been in the works before the french formalal involvement. should the united states be negotiating with these al qaeda linked groups? >> here is the difficulty and you have done great reporting on this. for the last six years this particular al qaeda affiliate has been taking westerners hostages and have been using this for bargaining power. they then use the monetary ransom in order to build their organization. they are also freshly supplied from some of the weapons that they picked up in libya. so we have a situation, frankly, where i think we have to hope that the french foreign legion forces and other forces engage and make very quick progress. i say that because once
the ban on women in combat units. >> therefore today, general dempsey and i, are pleased to announce that we are eliminating the direct ground combat exclusion rule for women. and we are moving forward with a plan to eliminate all unnecessary gender based barriers to service. >> so, eliminating this ban is going to take time. the military now begins what officials call, quote, the assessment phase. they will examine all units and produce a time line. every three months leaders have to check in on progress, and if it's found that a woman is not fit for the unit, exemption may be sought. >> your mission for today, you are going to the village of -- >> thank you, thank you. >> we've intel that there's possibly three to five fighters out in the village. you are going to be going out with osi to do a source meet in the village with ahmed at the car garage, be aware that they are possibly armed with rpgs and small arms. ahmed, this is tech sgt. andrea jefferson's worst nightmare, taking on enemy fire and a comrade goes down. >> he is bleeding here, hold pressure on the wound. >> as an air
this in a one-three month time when. why should we do that? where the united states of america. we cannot manage our affairs in such a way that we pay our bills and provide certainty in terms of how we pay our bills? look. i do not think anyone would consider my position on reasonable. major, i am happy to have a conversation about how we reduce our deficits. i'm not going to have a monthly or every three months conversation about whether or not we pay our bills. that in and of itself does severe damage. even the threat of default hurts our economy. it hurts our economy as we speak. if we want to have a conversation about how to reduce our deficit, let's do it. we have been having that for the last two years. we just had an entire campaign about it. the american people agreed with me that we should reduce our deficits in a balanced way that takes into account the need to grow this economy and put people back to work. despite that conversation and despite the election results, the position that has been taken on the part of house republicans is that we have to do it our way. if we don't, we simpl
to have details of the government's announcement. i didn't always watch out for myself. with unitedhealthcare, i get personalized information and rewards for addressing my health risks. but she's still going to give me a heart attack. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. mommy's having a french fry. yes she is, yes she is. [ bop ] [ male announcer ] could've had a v8. 100% vegetable juice, with three of your daily vegetable servings in every little bottle. with three of your daily vegetable servings why take exercise so seriously,when it can be fun? push-ups or sprints? what's wrong with fetch? or chase? let's do this larry! ooh, i got it, i got it! (narrator) the calorie-smart nutrition in beneful healthy weight... includes grains and real chicken, because a healthy dog is a playful dog. beneful healthy weight. find us on facebook to help put more play in your day. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash before your eyes. ♪ make it worth watching. ♪ the new 2013 lexus ls. an entirely new pursuit. >>> venezuela's president will not be sworn in for a
secretary leon panetta says the united states will take all necessary and proper steps to deal with this matter. the terrorists say the attack and revenged because algeria they say allowed western jets to use airspace to attack islamic fighters in neighbor mali. algerian state report two terrorists died at the facility. at this hour many more lives are at risk. "the fox report's" correspondent jonathan hunt live in our newsroom tonight. jonathan, good evening to you. how can they carry out or did they carry out this attack that we believe? >> it appears, bill, to have been pretty well planned. these terrorists first attacked a bus carrying workers from particular gas facility. that's when a british man and a norwegianen were killed apparently. police forces, algerian police forces beat back that attack. then those militants went to the gas facility that you are looking at right here they went into the living quarters. they managed to get in pretty easily apparently and took these dozens of hostage that. tonight we understand from the algerian interior minister that algerian min
in united states called burning springs because the of naturally occurring methane in the water. in pennsylvania, the first case they had of water catching on fire was in 1670. it is been happening for a while. they have had documented cases in colorado of wells catching .ire since the 20's this has caused a panic nonetheless. it does become a celebrity cause to talk about how fracking is going to mess up all the drinking water, all of our sins are going to catch on fire. it is amazing to me -- sinks are going to catch on fire. it is amazing to me how much money they have to put towards this propaganda. they have enough money to advertise. i do not think we ever had an exxon ad in the national review. >> >> promised land, the primary backers was uae. >> why would they want to do that? [laughter] >> protecting what they have. did not want to see the technology that we have here come see them over there. >> a lot of people do not realize this huge trade deficit we have. half of it historical has been energy products, mostly oil. if you get to the point where you are a self-suffici
's not been obvious to many governments around the world. the government of the united kingdom that spent a decade asking and promoting what it saw as nonviolent islamist extremist groups under the theory that only they could talk to the and dissuade violent extremists only to income in the end, the end of the blair period, that the shared world view was disastrous, and that, obviously, they should be backing antiextremists, individuals, and arguments. chambers' story, as has been said, is not the story of the loss of faith, but the acceptance of faith, christianity. in the current islamic case, the analogy is not perfect, but there is an analogy. after all, chambers was born into a faith and culture of christianity, in and around new york, in the first decade of the 20th century. he did not, in the end, adopt some foreign religion, but his own religion. that of his ancestors. similarly, we don't have to seek to have islamists convert to a foreign religion, but rather claim islam of their own ancestors, one unpoisenned by the extremism we associate with al-qaeda. the problem for us is tha
of the foreign policy of the united states and destructive of this country's historic alliance with their strongest middle east ally, israel. host: why did you call them -- what you call him socks? others call him neutral. caller: when he says you should talk with hamas, a terrorist regime, that officially is classified as a terrorist organization by the united states, when he proposes to engage with hamas, that as being soft on terrorism. when he refuses to take a position against hezbollah, as he did, i say that as being soft on hezbollah, which is also a well-recognized terrorist organization. i say he is soft on iran, the positions he has taken have been positions that would undermine our attempts to prevent iran from obtaining nuclear weapons. host: less mature -- let me get your reaction to the opinion section of "usa today" -- caller: i think obama paused val has to be carried out. i think he should have a secretary of defense who is not taking a contrary position. host: other challenges ahead for the defense secretary, whoever that may be -- this is "u.s. aid today" --
in mind if they are very concentrated and very sedentary. 10% of all people in the united states on about 80% of the guns. they're mostly middle-class, middle-age people in rural areas and hold onto their guns for a long time. on the other hand, most of the people engaging crying our teens and young adults in most criminal careers are short. one of things that means if there's a new generation of young people trying to solve the problem fresh and getting their hands on guns and one way you could take about the challenge here, the situation here is if you think about the united states being like a giant bathtub with 300 million guns, but nothing to worry about the entire town. just a few million guns changing hands every year and trying to divert them away from the high risk. the other thing i like to mention that the conversation right now is a bunch of stuff going on the federal level and a bunch of states to innovate on their own. one of the things important to keep in mind the slow side from hawaii, no state is an island. every state is doing on the gun regulations that is relevant in
the criminal division. in 1998, bob returned to san francisco as united states attorney. please join me in welcoming my good friend and one of america's most distinguished public servants, robert muller. [applause] >> let me start off by thanking mason for that kind introduction. i will say -- you often wonder when a former professor is going to introduce you. you do not know what is going to come out. but, thank you. you were there to kick start my career when it needed kick starting. let me thank the commonwealth club for having me back. it is great to be back in san francisco but also to be back with you this afternoon. two months ago, we marked the 10th anniversary of the september 11 attacks. the horrific events of that day were the prelude to a decade of political, economic, and cultural transformation, and globalization and technology have accelerated these changes. consider now how different our world was in the summer of 2001. leaders of egypt, iraq, and libya were entrenched in power. barack obama was an illinois state senator, and arnold schwarzenegger was a movie actor. 10 y
the united nations and others that weapons have gotten from libya into algeria, which points out our need as we look at transitions occurring in that region, syria, assad is not going to be there we think much longer. there's a lot of weapons in syria. do we have a strategy to make sure as we go through transition in countries that their weapons are -- we're mindful that these weapons could end up harming u.s. interests and it needs to be part of the strategy that make sure as we support alternative governments and the rebels that there is a strong priority in protecting the source of these weapons not ending up harming americans or harming our interests. >> well, senator, you're absolutely right. one of the reasons that we and other government agencies is exactly that, we have a concerted effort to try to track down and find and recover as many man pads and other dangerous weapons as possible. libya was a wash in weapons before the revolution. obviously there were additional weapons introduced. but the vast, vast majority came out of gadhafi warehouses and as they were saying, liberated
castro in his native land, he dedicated his life to opposing communism. as a cia operative units involved in the ill-fated bay of pigs operation. in the following years he was involved in the tracking of the revolutionary che guevara. this is about an hour. c-span: felix rodriguez, the author of "shadow warrior: the cia hero of a hundred unknown battles," let me read you one sentence from page 65 and get your reaction. "i volunteered to assassinate fidel castro and the americans took me up on it." >> guest: well, it was in 1960, when we were in the training camps, actually were in panama then for final training for the bay of pigs and a friend of mine and i thought that it would shorten the war in cuba if fidel were taken out, so we called our case officer at that time in the area of panama where we were, and we volunteered to kill fidel. we were, at that time, about 19 years old then. c-span: how close did you get? >> guest: well, we were given a rifle with a telescopic sight and we were -- three times we attempted to infiltrate cuba, with a boat that had a ukrainian crew on it, plus an
of the national commission on terrorist attacks upon the united states, better known as the 9/11 commission. the commission found that 18 of the 9/11 hijackers had 30 ids between them, including six that were used on the morning of the attack. the commission called on the federal government to set standards for the issuance of birth certificates and secure identification such as driver's licenses. recognizing that sources of identification are the last opportunity to make sure people are who they say the art and to help hold gary sick to be. the real id act is not just an important tool for holding terrorist activity and security. it's also an important tool for helping to combat fraud and identity theft. passed in 2005, the real id act sets voluntary standards for the states to meet regarding id security speak these include facial recognition capture, improved document authenticity, data verification between face come increased card security, enhanced issuer integrity, and lawful status checks on noncitizens applicants. by meeting these standards state ids will be acceptable for official p
in this region and the united states has to be as effective in partnering with the non-jihadists whether they fly a black flag or any other flag. >> i clearly understand that, however, this flag was pointed out to be affiliated with al qaeda, terrorists who attack and kill united states citizens and other individuals around the world. do you -- did anyone in your department below you, were they aware of this report and these photos prior to? and don't you think they should have brought this to your attention? >> well, what i'm trying to say, congressman, is i am well aware that there were people claiming to be associated with al qaeda that were attempting to influence militias, attempting to exercise more authority along with a number of other groups that didn't necessarily work under that flag but had the same militant jihadist mentality. so yes, i was aware of that. and so was chris stevens and so was our team in libya. >> but my point is this flag kept coming up and you do not think that that was important enough to increase security when after how many embassies where this flag was shown in d
's intimidated by the israeli lobby in the united states senate. >> well, first -- >> name one. >> i don't know. >> well, why would you say it? >> i didn't have in mind a specific person. >> sir, do you agree it's provocative statement. i can't think of a more provocative thing to say about the relationship between the united states and israel and the senate or the congress than what you said. name one dumb thing we have been goaded in to do because of the pressure of the israeli or jewish lobby. >> i have already stated that i regret the term nlg. >> you said back then it makes us do dumb things. you can't name one senator intimidated. now give me one example of the dumb things we're pressured to do up here. >> we were talking in that interview about the middle east. about positions. about israel. >> now that exchange followed another faceoff earlier today with senator john mccain over the war in iraq. >> will you please answer the question? will you correct or incorrect when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since until nam? were you co
from a few more. >> here he is -- he was at the time? >> deputy attorney general of the united states. >> it was clear he was not going to carry out that order. he turned to me and said, what are you going to do? i told him -- i do not think it is close. what he is asking and apparently subsequently needed to do was fundamentally wrong. he said, you do not have any choice if you refuse to do it -- that means they will find somebody else to do it. if bork had not done it, anybody in the department could have done it. your responsibility was fairly clear -- i do not think he resigned lightly. you do have an obligation. there are lines over which you cannot cross. you have to -- sometimes you will not do. >> this is really important. i did my best to interview as many surviving players in the saturday night -- your audience may not now what do you here is talking about, but president nixon wanted to fire the special prosecutor archibald cox. he ordered the attorney general of the united states to do it and he would not. the next person in line was ruckleshaus, and he would not do it. ell
that hillary was married to a president of the united states through an eight-year tenure, and she knows better than anyone else that barack obama will talk to, what it's like to be the president of the most important country in the world. that seems to me to be where the real bond probably came from. >> between the two of them, they lived 12 years in that house. and hillary, i think, certainly knows her way around. and you can't -- i wanted to ask another question about bill. and i think that it was pretty clear that bill and the president have not -- that he was more resistant to the marriage, the political marriage than she was. but also, i think one of the reasons that they did this was, i think the president wanted to close the relationship circle, you know, end the circle. to close the circle with the clintons. in the sense that they had been incredibly helpful to him. particularly bill. in campaigning for him back in 2008 after hillary lost the nomination, and particularly this year when the president was involved in a really difficult race. and people wondered how much help he would get
to the united states command given the limited capacity in some cases the limited political will of the countries in which these groups operate. the u.s. military intelligence and security assistance resources devoted to these threats adequately are appropriately balanced and what recommendations would you have for us? >> if you are focusing just on north africa, al qaeda is a brand name as much as an organization. people wake up, they form these jihadists groups. they then plan to be associated with somehow, affiliated with al qaeda to gain credibility with local people as well as beyond. i think that we have to take seriously all of these terrorist groups, whatever they call themselves. now, at the moment they don't necessarily have either the interest or the devotee to attack our homeland. but we have a lot of facilities. we have a lot of assets in north africa. we just saw americans killed and held hostage at a gas as a buddy because we do business all over that continent so we have to take a hard look at all of them and constantly be helping our military intelligence an
as we think about the economy of the united states coming and as you point out, the other developing countries around the world. one of the efforts of this administration has been to promote business advocacy abroad for domestic businesses at home. i led a trade mission to india about a year and a half ago with a number of businesses from new and church, and they talked about how important it was to have that support from the state officials in india as they were looking to try to establish those business relationships. can you talk about how you might continue that and continue that this is something you would be focused on an unwilling to continue to support? >> well, as i said in my opening, i think foreign policy is increasingly economic policy, and we have an undersecretary for economic affairs, economics, energy etc.. i think that the state department historical use to have a foreign commercial service back in 1979. it slipped away. i think the secretary had the time -- i think that is something we ought to be doing in a very significant way. obviously working with the treasury
of the united states, or who is, it is not special that this is a presidential debate. if you have the opportunity to ask a question about a major issue, take the opportunity because most of the time, in his view, the politician will use you and your network to sell his point of view and himself. if you have the opportunity to do your thing and ask the tough questions, that is the bernie shaw line. we learned in 1960 that kennedy arrived tan, rested, ready, and nixon was pale, 5 o'clock shadow, restless. at that time, studies suggested that kennedy won the debate on television but nixon won on radio. he came across as authoritative. you guys have been at this. what is important in our world of television that is so critical? what is the key thing? a wonderful, clear policy presentation or wearing the kind of socks you are today. really lovely socks. what grabs you like mondale in 1984, where's the beef. senator, you are no jack kennedy. the line or the more structured presentation. >> people vote for president. this is a different vote from anything you have to cast. if you vote fo
an elaborate sex slave network right here in the united states. you will not believe the conditions the women had to endure. >>> i'm wolf blitzer here on the national wall in washington. behind me the west front of the u.s. capitol where president barack obama will take the oath of office on monday. we're counting down to the inauguration. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with what we now know is the ongoing hostage crisis in algeria. right now it's unclear how many americans are being held by terrorists. but we do know the united states, the obama administration has rejected an offer to exchange an undisclosed number of american hostages. other hostages have been freed and hair he would winning new details are emerging about their treatment. for the details, let's bring in jill dougherty. she's over at the state department. jill? >> wolf, just a few minutes ago here at the state department i was upstairs, secretary clinton meeting with the japanese foreign minister and both of them discussing this crisis in algeria. she said that she had spoken yet again with her algerian counter
by concentrating on a particular institution the united states congress. why is that? >> well, if you want to see the problem with the uncompromised might set look no further than the congress, the 112 congress in washington. gridlock nothing gets passed. the least legislation in the last 50 years, and why? because everybody is campaigning all the time. there is very little relationship across the aisle, and we went out to the brink of the debt ceiling crisis before compromise was reached which was routine in the past. so we thought that by focusing on congress whose popularity is at an all-time low, john mccain said you can account for the 9% popularity of congress during the debt ceiling crisis by blood relatives and paid staffers. we felt by focusing on congress we could both diagnosed the problem and give some prescriptions for how to overcome it. >> which of those prescriptions? >> one of those prescriptions is very simple, which is congressmen need to exercise leadership by mixing my and sets, by putting aside the campaign mindset won enough to govern, and adopting the compromise and might
that such worries were anachronistic. the passion of human beings in society such as the united states had believed to be domesticated. the no longer pretend to be tyrannical or otherwise undermine the order. hence wilson thought the state emancipated from the founders static constitution should be coming and i quote him, had instrumentalities for quickening in every suitable way. of collective and individual development. well, who was to determine what these might be suitable? the answer might be the government itself. wilson was as progressives tended to be a historic assist. that is someone with a strong sense of history he thought had its own unfolding logic, its autonomous trajectory, its proper destination. was the duty of leaders to discern the destination towards progressing and to make government the unfettered of the process, progressives tend to exalt the role of farsighted leaders and the role of the american president. this too put them at odds with the founders. the words leader and leaders of here just 13 times in all of the federalist papers. once as a reference to those that led th
into default. that amendment contained a section stating that the validity of the public and the united states shall not be questioned. at best interpret those words to be authorization for the president to act on his own is to say the least eight tortured reasoning. and as a matter of law, the federal borrowing limit is set by congressional approval. the white house, not as adventurous as the democrats in congress to send that letter. the white house unwilling to take on more than one constitutional amendment and challenge at a time. white house spokesman jay carney today. >> the proposition on the 14th amendment has not changed. let's be clear. congress has the responsibility and the sole authority to raise the debt ceiling. congress must do its job. lou: the administration does appear willing to go around congress to enact at least some gun-control measures. we will be debating tonight the administration's efforts to broaden and control in this country, talking with former birdie campaign president richard a. bourne in constitutional law professor david. vice-president joe biden today met w
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